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  • Colchicine is given by mouth and is used off label to primarily treat amyloidosis and Shar-Pei fever. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects are not well documented and may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, skin rash, incoordination, severe tiredness, weakness, infections, bleeding, or bruising. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or in pets with severe kidney, gastrointestinal, or heart disease. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Colostrum is given by mouth and is used over the counter to treat various immune-mediated and inflammatory conditions. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects are uncommon and may include gastrointestinal upset in pets with a dairy allergy. There are no known contraindications. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12 or cobalamin) is a vitamin supplement used to treat systemic deficiencies. It can be given through a subcutaneous injection or oral tablet. The injection may sting temporarily, but otherwise is very safe. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinary office.

  • Cyclophosphamide is given by mouth or injection and is used off label to treat various cancers such as lymphoma, leukemia, carcinoma, and sarcoma. Common side effects include hair loss and hair coat changes. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or that cannot be sufficiently monitored during treatment, are pregnant or lactating, have urinary obstruction, infection, bone marrow dysfunction, or have had an episode of blood in the urine that is not associated with a bladder infection. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Cyclosporine ophthalmic ointment is an immunosuppressant used in the treatment of eye diseases suspected to be immune-related, including keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) in dogs, and other inflammatory conditions of the eye. Cyclosporine comes as an ophthalmic ointment but may sometimes be compounded into a higher concentration ophthalmic solution for pets not responding to the ointment. It is important to remember that it may take days to weeks to notice improvement. Do not stop giving the medication without asking your veterinarian. If signs of serious side effects or immune suppression occur, contact your veterinarian immediately. An overdose of eye medication is unlikely, but side effects or toxic effects could occur if your pet eats the medication. If you suspect an overdose or an adverse reaction to the medication, call your veterinary office immediately.

  • Cyclosporine is given by mouth and is used to treat atopic dermatitis in dogs and cats. It has also been used off-label to treat other types of immune-mediated conditions. Give as directed. The most common side effects include stomach upset, such as vomiting, diarrhea, and decreased appetite. Do not use in pets with severe infections, a history of cancer, allergies to the medication, that are nursing or pregnant, or in pets younger than six months old. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • Cyproheptadine is given by mouth and is used off label to treat allergic skin conditions, certain toxicities, and to stimulate appetite. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include sleepiness, increased appetite, and dry mouth. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or pets undergoing skin allergy testing within the next two weeks. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Cytarabine is a chemotherapy medication commonly used off label to treat blood cancers and brain inflammation. It is an injectable solution usually given in the vein by a veterinary professional. Common side effects include gastrointestinal upset and low blood cell counts. This medication should not be used or used with caution in pets with liver or kidney disease, or those that have an allergy to this medication, or pregnant /lactating pets. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinary office.

  • Decoquinate is given by mouth and is used off label in dogs to prevent coccidia infections. Side effects are uncommon. Do not use in animals that are allergic to it or to treat coccidia infections (only use as a preventive). If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Deracoxib (brand name Deramaxx®) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs after surgery to reduce the pain associated with surgery (e.g., orthopedic and dental surgeries), as well as for the treatment of osteoarthritis. Like other NSIADs, deracoxib can affect the gastrointestinal tract with side effects. Use of other NSAIDs or corticosteroids should be avoided while your dog is taking deracoxib. Your veterinarian will do periodic blood tests to check liver and kidney function if your dog is taking deracoxib for extended periods.